Nursery Rhyme Week 2018

Nursery Rhyme Week 2018

Today sees the start of World Nursery Rhyme Week 2018. If it’s not something you’ve come across before then it’s well worth signing up to the site as you can then access a whole range of materials to help you and your children celebrate the five nursery rhymes across the week (or any other week!).

The five rhymes this year are:

Monday – Five Currant Buns

Tuesday – Humpty Dumpty

Wednesday – A Sailor Went to Sea

Thursday – I’m a Little Tea Pot

Friday – Round and Round the Garden.

Importance of Nursery Rhymes

Nursery rhymes are so important for young children. It’s a way for them to sing, practice their language, learn those first steps in counting, being to tell stories., amongst many other things. World Nursery Rhyme Week is a fantastic way to focus on nursery rhymes and really enjoy them with young children. It’s an event I try to take part in each year (although sometimes I do it the week after the official week!) and I love singing these simple and fun rhymes with the children.

Five Currant Buns

Today we kicked off with the first one, Five Currant Buns. Last night I had printed some of the fab resources (created by the wonderful Mrs Mactivity and if you look at the end of this post then you’ll see a fantastic deal to sign up to access all their other resources). We, first of all, played the song on YouTube. We sang it to Harry and I got Emma to count down the buns. We then sang again but this time added actions – these were simple ones of making a fat round bun with our hands, and tapping our head to signify the ‘sugar on the top’.

Daniel then decided to get his recorder out to play the tune (he got a bit mixed up with Hot Cross Buns!).

After we had had lots of singing and dancing, clapping and jumping we had a look at the materials. We didn’t make use of them all, we mostly looked at the colouring sheets. One of the resources has keywords from the rhyme to trace over so I got Emma to read these out; if she correctly read them then she traced over the words. I was surprised at just how many she could read, and it was nice to watch Daniel help her on some of those she struggled with.

I had planned to do some baking with them – to make some actual currant buns but, to be honest, it’s been one of those days and we just never quite got round to it! There is, however, lots of things you can do with this nursery rhyme. Here are just a few additional ideas:

  • Make currant buns from playdoh. Make them in different shapes (square, flat, thin, round etc) and get the children to identify which ones fit the description in the song (round and fat)
  • Act out the rhyme with different characters – instead of the line ‘along came a boy with a penny one day’ we had the children’s names, their favourite soft toys and friends and family members. We used toys to act as puppets to act out the rhyme with Harry loved
  • Set up a few felt shapes for children to put together the currant buns. This could be as simple as a round piece of felt for the bun, some smaller black circles for the currants, white for icing and red pompoms for the cherry. Get the children to use small tools such as grabbers and tweezers to move the pieces into position to create five currant bonds
  • Practice number bonds to five
  • Tap out the rhythm of the rhyme with hands or feet. Add in different instruments such as tambourine, shakers or a triangle.
  • As well as making currant buns, you could decorate biscuits such as rich tea or digestives to look like currant buns – simple to do with icing sugar and glace cherries!

What other things did you do to celebrate World Nursery Rhyme Week today, and what other activities do you suggest for this nursery rhyme?

Also – do check out the fab offer below from Mrs Mactivity

Please note this is not a sponsored post – I really love world nursery rhyme week and Mrs Mactivity and use these without being asked or compensated.

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